Celebrating American Disability Act's 31st anniversary

Today celebrates the 31st anniversary of the ADA which came into effect in 1990 and forbids discrimination against individuals with disabilities in all sectors of public life such as education, work, travel, public and private places. The ADA passage was an important milestone in ensuring that people with disabilities have equal rights and opportunities.


Image Source: Celina Oseguera and ADA logo credit: ADA National Network.
Image Source: Celina Oseguera and ADA logo credit: ADA National Network.

We are happy to work with many other partners to ensure that individuals with disabilities are included in all aspects of employment by federal contractors, including equal opportunity and nondiscrimination in hiring, wages, and promotions.


The Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) released useful resources today that help encourage disability inclusion in the workplace, and we'd like to share them with you.


  1. Reasonable Accommodations Pocket Card – This pocket card assists applicants, employees and other interested parties in understanding the process for requesting a reasonable accommodation.

  2. Disability Rights Facts Sheet – This fact sheet provides information on employee and applicant rights as an individual with a disability. It addresses multiple areas including the definition of a disability, the protections OFCCP enforces, and reasonable accommodations. It also provides information on filing a complaint related to discrimination in hiring, firing, pay, benefits, job assignments, promotions, layoffs, job training, recruitment, or other personnel activities because of disability.

  3. Disability Inclusion Starts With You – As part of OFCCP’s ongoing efforts to support greater self-identification by individuals with disabilities, we created this video to explain the benefits of voluntary self-identification. Contractors may wish to download and post this video on their Intranet or company websites to share with their employees and job applicants who may be reluctant to self-identify, or who may not understand why they are being asked to self-identify.